Bike Tour 2017 – Copenhagen to Hamburg

July 20 – To Ringsted – 60 km

After about 4 km of riding in the Copenhagen, we enjoyed paved paths through nature reserves, farmland and seaside paths.

Seaside path south of Copenhagen

For the first 20 km we did not have to cross a road at grade. Then mostly roadside paths and quiet country roads.

July 21 – To Nyborg -60 km

We visited St. Benedict Church in Ringstead. This church dates from the 13th century and is the oldest church in Denmark to be built from bricks. Many royals were buried in this church.

Quiet roads and paths along highways. It is always nice to see a freshly painted conflict zone. 

We stopped in Slagelse which has a nice car free central square and adjacent streets. 

Then on to Korsor to catch a train under a straight to Nyborg. It proved very difficult to purchase tickets due to having bikes. Reservations were required by phoning a certain number and then using a code to purchase tickets. However nobody at the other end could speak Engish which is very unusual in Denmark. Thanks to a kind Danish lady, we managed to sort things out.  

July 22 – To Fynshav – 82 km

We followed a regional bike route most of the way across the island. Half way along, we  stumbled acsoss a paved rail trail which we followed for about 10 km. 

Rest of the route was mostly on quiet roads. Along the way we stopped to take pictures of a cute water mill. The owner invited us in for a look. She explainef that the mill was pretty run down when they bought it 7 years ago. The mill is now fully operational but is used only occasionally to grind grain. After passing through the seaside town of ??? We caught a ferry to the next island. Saw an interesting treatment for bike lanes.

Nice treatment for bike lanes

The width of the white line is about twice normal and the white rectangles are raised, creating a bike frienly rumble strip. I have seen this on road edges in Hungary and Germany as well. Note that bike lanes are rare in Europe.

July 23 – To Aabenraa – 51 km

Rode along separated paths most of the way to the seaside town named Soldborg. One path went through a residential part of the city. All new suburbs should be designed around paths like this.

A palace in Grasten was along our route. Castle grounds were unfortunately closed due to the royal family staying there for the summer. Interesting that the palace was guarded by costumed soldiers who mechanically followed  a pacing ritual.

Summer palace of Danish royal family

We try to avoid busy highways, but had to ride about 10 km on busyish hwy. Our accommodation was by the sea and our host kindly offered the use of his kayaks and paddleboards.

July 24 – To Romo Island – 80 km

We could not find any designated cycle routes but managed to plot a route that included cycle tracks and paths as well as mostly quiet roads. On the way,  we noticed a particlarly good treatment for a cycle track. The edge of the raised cycle track was clearly marked. This is not common but good people not used to riding on cycle tracks.

A 2 km section of busy highway with no shoulder was definitely the low point of the dack We lucked out at the end of the day when a heavy downpour let loose seconds after checking in to our accommodations.

 July 25 – Rest day on Romo Island

July 26 – To Neukirchen, Germany – 61 km

Took a ferry to Sylt Island in Germany. The northern part is all dunes and almost all houses have thatched roofs – even the bus shelters and shelters along the bike paths. 

Lots of people cycling! Lots of hiking trails in the dunes. Lots of bikes parked at trailheads.

All the buseds we saw on Silt Iskad had bike racks on the back that coukd accommodate 4 bikes. Why not in Canafa?

Pic coming

Last part of the route involved takung a train back to the mainland. Unfortunately, we were delayed due to a bike on train restriction during peak hours.

July 27 -To Husum – 69 km

We first cycled toward the coast to connect with the North Sea Route aka EuroVelo 1. We were not disapointed since we were soon on a wide, paved path along the North Sea with a strong tail wind to boot. Heaven!

Tide must have been high, since a portion of the path was flooded.

July 28 – To Meldorf 66 km

Husum has a castle snd a nice car free square. 

Pic coming

Damp day, though we missed the worst downpours by hunkering down under a railroad bridge in Husum and having lunch in a bus shelter along the way. Some travel on paths along highways and also sections of quiet country roadwayWe followed the North Sea Route much of the way.

At one point the bike path along a highway seemed to end at a construction zone where road traffic was restricted to one way alternating. We were about to join the road treffic when we noticed that a temporary path was created through the construction zone.

July 29 – To Gluckstadt – 58 km

We followed the North Sea/Elbe River Routes most of the day. We again reached the North Sea at Brunsbuttel which lies where the Elbe River enters the North Sea. Took a free ferry actoss the North-East Canal.

Pic

Then the route again followed the coast through sheep pastures which lay between a dike and the estuary of the Elbe River.

Movie

July 30 – Rest day in Gluckstadt

We rested. 

I did discover an interesting housing model in Gluckstadt. Row houses were placed along a Greenway beside a small canal. Front door faced the greenway and there was no motor vehicle access.  Every block or so there was a small parking lot for a few cars. This would be a good model for adding car free housing along wider portions of the Arbutus Greenway in Vancouver.

Pic coming

July 31 – To Hamburg

Followed the Elbe River Route most of the way. Note that we followed another portion of this route earlier in our tour between the Czech/German border and Lutherstadt. 

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